Sleepy teens: A public health epidemic | Wendy Troxel | TEDxManhattanBeach

Translator: Joanna Pietrulewicz Reviewer: Krystian Aparta It’s six o’clock in the morning, pitch black outside. My 14-year-old son is fast asleep in his bed, sleeping the reckless, deep sleep of a teenager.

I flip on the light and physically shake the poor boy awake, because I know that, like ripping off a Band-Aid, it’s better to get it over with quickly. (Laughter) I have a friend who yells “Fire!” just to rouse her sleeping teen.

And another who got so fed up that she had to dump cold water on her son’s head just to get him out of bed. Sound brutal … but perhaps familiar? Every morning I ask myself, “How can I — knowing what I know and doing what I do for a living — be doing this to my own son?” You see, I’m a sleep researcher.

(Laughter) So I know far too much about sleep and the consequences of sleep loss. I know that I’m depriving my son of the sleep he desperately needs as a rapidly growing teenager. I also know that by waking him up hours before his natural biological clock tells him he’s ready, I’m literally robbing him of his dreams — the type of sleep most associated with learning, memory consolidation and emotional processing.

But it’s not just my kid that’s being deprived of sleep. Sleep deprivation among American teenagers is an epidemic. Only about one in 10 gets the eight to 10 hours of sleep per night recommended by sleep scientists and pediatricians.

Now, if you’re thinking to yourself, “Phew, we’re doing good, my kid’s getting eight hours,” remember, eight hours is the minimum recommendation. You’re barely passing. Eight hours is kind of like getting a C on your report card.

There are many factors contributing to this epidemic, but a major factor preventing teens from getting the sleep they need is actually a matter of public policy. Not hormones, social lives or Snapchat.

Across the country, many schools are starting around 7:30am or earlier, despite the fact that major medical organizations recommend that middle and high school start no earlier than 8:30am. These early start policies have a direct effect on how much — or really how little sleep American teenagers are getting.

They’re also pitting teenagers and their parents in a fundamentally unwinnable fight against their own bodies. Around the time of puberty, teenagers experience a delay in their biological clock, which determines when we feel most awake and when we feel most sleepy.

This is driven in part by a shift in the release of the hormone melatonin. Teenagers’ bodies wait to start releasing melatonin until around 11pm, which is two hours later than what we see in adults or younger children.

This means that waking a teenager up at 6am is the biological equivalent of waking an adult up at 4am. On the unfortunate days when I have to wake up at 4am, I’m a zombie. Functionally useless. I can’t think straight, I’m irritable, and I probably shouldn’t be driving a car.

But this is how many American teenagers feel every single

SOURCE: click to continue reading Sleepy teens: A public health epidemic | Wendy Troxel | TEDxManhattanBeach

How do you actually raise your vibration?

Before I tell you what you want to know, I am going to tell you what is the main difference between a high vibration person and a low vibration person.

What the internet and thousands of sites say about vibration is all b.s. None of those garden variety, and outside changes will ever lead to inner changes: vibration is an entirely inner phenomenon. What’s going on inside.

And whether higher vibration will attract goodies to you: No. Higher vibration will make you do the kinds of things with the kinds of attitudes that produce what you want, and if it is goodies… then get you the goodies, including money.

SOURCE: click to continue reading How do you actually raise your vibration?

Here is a little inspiration… for freedom, for liberty, for being moved by what’s possible

https://evp-50116959de4b9-dd521b5ed563ee25508422182c681a30.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/Pete%20Seeger%20_%20Bruce%20Springsteen%20-%20This%20Land%20is%20Your%20Land%20-%20Obama%20Inauguration.mp4

I don’t know about you, but I need to be reminded occasionally, that life is not about me, that even my life isn’t about me. That there are bigger and better things, more inspiring than what’s going on in my little world.

This short video did the job famously for me today. Enjoy.

SOURCE: click to continue reading Here is a little inspiration… for freedom, for liberty, for being moved by what’s possible

The Neurological Consequences of a Misfit Mouth on Sleep | Jerald Simmons | TEDxSugarLand

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WoJ63AFmFyA00:00:11Well I've always been fascinated by neuroscience and the science medicine have mostly been interested in00:00:18the brain because the brain is the microprocessor that controls her whole body and that interest is what led me to00:00:23become a neurologist but I didn't want to become blinded with a telescopic view of my specialty I wanted to learn how00:00:29the brain interacted with other parts of the body and that's what led me to become a sleep specialist see during a00:00:35sleep study we're measuring multiple organ systems and we're measuring what goes on during the night throughout the00:00:42body and we're seeing all the different interactions and what may be disturbing our sleep well over the last thirty00:00:48years the field of sleep medicine has evolved tremendously and I've been part of that process and I've watched my00:00:54whole professional career transform over the last thirty years and there's been a lot of new breakthroughs and a lot of00:00:59new concepts that have come about some of which are life transforming some of which I want to convey to you today to00:01:06exemplify this I want to tell you about little Johnny Johnny is the product of a normal pregnancy and Johnny's mom was00:01:12concerned though because Johnny didn't seem to sleep too well when she looked at him at night he had his mouth though00:01:17but he was breathing through his mouth and he had little raspy kind of sounds they did we toss and turn and he just00:01:21didn't seem to be getting much rest during the day he was very fidgety and he was very irritable she was concerned00:01:26and Johnny's thing to not breastfeed too well so she resorted to a bottle feeding well Johnny grew a couple years went by00:01:34still not a good sleeper and now he's getting ready to go to kindergarten and so I'm still concerned and she goes to00:01:40the pediatrician then he's got to get his shots before he goes off to kindergarten and she's conveying that00:01:45Johnny just seems to not sleep too well he's tossing and turning and it's always getting congested he makes a little bit00:01:51of a snoring rasp and kind of sound and during the day he's very fidgety and he doesn't want to sit still he seems sort00:01:56of hyperactive well the pediatrician sort of discounts to this and says don't worry Johnny is like a lot of other kids00:02:01that I see it'll probably go away he'll outgrow it well about a year goes by he's now in first grade and he's still00:02:08sleeping poorly and the reports from school don't seem to be so good the teachers are concerned because Johnny00:02:13isn't very focused he can't keep up with the other students actually he's pretty disruptive in class so their teachers00:02:20are telling mom I think you should take Johnny to the pediatrician and see if there's some medication that maybe

SOURCE: click to continue reading The Neurological Consequences of a Misfit Mouth on Sleep | Jerald Simmons | TEDxSugarLand

How To Trick Your Brain Into Falling Asleep | Jim Donovan | TEDxYoungstown

Translator: Tanya Cushman Reviewer: Rhonda Jacobs It’s October 2010. I’m freaking out. Sirens are blaring above me. I’m laying on a stretcher in the back of an ambulance. My doctor just told me I’m having a heart attack.

I’m trembling, my arms are tingling, and this pain in my chest is crushing me from the inside. Tracey and the kids have no idea where I am. I might never get to hold them again. This can’t be happening.

My life cannot be over! And yet here I am, probably dying. But it doesn’t happen. Instead, I get extracted from my good life and thrust into a reality out of my control. I’ve got tubes jammed in my veins, sensors covering my chest, and a cold, silver bedpan waiting patiently beside me.

I also get to wear this unflattering hospital gown while they administer every possible test they can charge my insurance company for. (Laughter) On the third day of this drama, my doctor walks in and announces, “Well, good news, Jim.

You’re healthy as a horse. No heart attack, just some really bad anxiety.” And then he asks me, “Now, what’s a healthy man like you having so much anxiety for? What’s your life like?” Well, then I got to confess about the morning routine I’ve developed being a drummer in a band on the road.

When I wake up in the morning, I crack open a can of Red Bull so that I can wake up enough to drink a pot of coffee. (Laughter) Then I drink several more cans through the day. I also fess up about eating too much sugar – like four bowls of Lucky Charms before bed too much – and that for some reason, I have trouble sleeping.

Even though I am chronically exhausted, I usually get about four hours of sleep per night. The doctor’s face turned somber. He looks at me and he says, “Jim, this is a get-out-of-jail-free card.

I want you to know, there was a man who came in the day before you, a year younger than you, with a similar condition, and who died this morning. Today you have a chance to make changes that will let you see your kids grow up.

Four hours of sleep per night is sleep deprivation, and there is no quicker way to die early than to skimp on sleep, especially with all the crap you’ve been consuming. You need at least seven hours to stay healthy.

” Seven hours. I haven’t gotten that much rest in a long time, and now my body’s breaking down. I know I’ve got to do something, or my next trip here might not end well. Soon I would discover something that changed my life from that moment on: the key to falling asleep is rhythm.

This discovery came from my need to solve a lifelong problem. Ever since I was a kid, at bedtime, I can never get my mind to stop thinking. Sometimes it will be a worry, other times a song would get stuck in my head and just loop around and around.

When I got home from the hospital, I decided to do some research, and so I researched sleep and the effects of sleep deprivation, which I learned include heart attack, stroke, weight gain, and just as my doctor had told me, premature death.

I also read a Harvard Business study that shows the impairment that happens at four hours of sleep per night is similar to the impairment that happens when a guy my size drinks five regular beers. Then I came across some startling statistics.

In the US alone, 35% of adults – that’s 86 million of us – are sleep deprived. What’s worse, 87% of teenagers. That’s 36 million kids whose brains are still developing are chronically sleep deprived.

Worldwide, scientists are calling sleep deprivation an emerging global epidemic, with low-income people and women being affected the most. I know I’ve got to do something, and so I let go of the energy drinks, I cut way back on coffee, and I even give up my nightly Lucky Charm feast.

And it helps. A little bit. But at bedtime, I still cannot get my mind to stop thinking. On my way home from work that week, an idea hit me. I don’t know why I haven’t thought of it before. Since 1999, I’ve been leading drumming workshops.

At the beginning of these programs, I lead an exercise where the group and I drum together a steady unison pattern like this: boomp, boomp, boomp, boomp, boomp. We do this for a few minutes. At the end, without fail, people tell me that the exercise helps them to feel more relaxed.

It had never occurred to me that I could do the exercise without my drum. And so that night, I did an experiment. At bedtime, I sat at the edge of my bed, and I brought my hands to my lap, and I began doing my drumming exercise on my legs, very lightly.

Upon seeing my strange behavior, my wife, Tracey, looked over at me, rolled her eyes and just turned out the light. But I kept at it. I wanted to find out if I could get the exercise to work. And at first, nothing happened.

But then, after about four minutes of persistence, I noticed my eyelids starting to get heavy. I was yawning, and I decided just to lay down and shut my eyes for a minute. When I opened them again, it was morning.

I slept a solid seven-and-a-half hours with no struggle falling asleep. And most nights, since 2010, I’ve been getting the best sleep of my life. I do it using an exercise I’m going to show you today that I call “brain tapping.

” Now, this exercise uses a phenomenon that happens in the brain: it’s called the “frequency-following response.” This is a very fancy way of saying that your brain loves to follow repeating, rhythmic patterns.

Essentially, your brain, first, notices that there’s a pattern, it connects with it, and it begins to follow it. Whenever you listen to your favorite music and do this, that’s the frequency-following response happening.

What we’re going to do is we’re going to help that frequency-following response to occur; we’re going to activate it, and then we’re going to help to slow the speed of your brain activity down by slowing down the rhythm.

Now, there might be a few of you out there right now that are thinking to yourself, “Does this hippie really want me to believe that I can use rhythm to help me fall asleep? Really?” And what I’d say back to you is “What if I could? What if I could show you how to fall asleep tonight in less time than it takes you to eat a bowl of cereal?” Would you try it? Now, here’s the great news.

You do not need to be good at rhythm for this to work, only willing to try. Here’s what happens. The exercise, it’s 30 seconds. What we’re going to do is bring our hands to our lap like this.

We’re going to be tapping at the speed of a ticking stopwatch – so right left, right left, right left – very lightly. As we do this, we’re going to breathe slowly. At the end, we’re going to slow the rhythm down.

So, if you’re willing, I’m going to invite you just to settle in. Take a big breath in. Begin very lightly tapping on your legs at the speed of a ticking stopwatch – right left, right left, right left.

If you’re comfortable, I want to invite you just to close your eyes so you can get the full experience. Next, we’re going to do a very slow breathing technique. Your job is just to do your best and take breaks if you need them.

So eyes are closed, we’re tapping lightly, and let’s start the breathing. Breathing in slowly, two, three – it’s very slow – four, and slowly out, two, three, four. Breathing in – doing great – two, three, four, and slowly out, two, three, four.

Breathing in – almost there – two, three, four. And slowly out, two – very good – three, four. And now, slow the tapping down, and slow it down again. Four, three, two, one. And relax. Take a moment to notice how your mind feels.

Let’s take a big breath in, and let it go. You can open your eyes. And I saw a couple of you yawning. I take that as a compliment, so thank you. (Laughter) If you got the exercise to work the first time, congratulations.

You’ve got a new friend you can call on tonight to help you get to sleep. If the exercise didn’t work as you hoped it would, don’t worry, you’re not broken. Sometimes it takes a few tries to get used to the exercise.

Please don’t give up. Now, imagine getting great sleep from now on. Imagine how much better you’ll feel, and then imagine people all over the world doing this exercise and getting better quality sleep.

Imagine how that might affect peacefulness everywhere. I’ve got a challenge for you: for the next five nights, I want to invite you just to run the exercise for at least three minutes. Remember, tap like a ticking stopwatch, breathe slowly, and at the end, slow the rhythm down.

Once you’re comfortable with it, I want you to feel free to teach it to anyone who needs it, especially kids. Good luck and sweet dreams. Thank you. (Applause) it’s October 2010 I’m freaking out sirens are blaring above me I’m playing on a stretcher in the back of an ambulance my doctor just told me I’m having a heart attack I’m trembling my arms are tingling and this pain in my chest is crushing me from the inside Tracy and the kids have no idea where I am I might never get to hold them again this can’t be happening my life cannot be over and yet Here I am probably dying but it doesn’t happen instead I get extracted from my good life and thrust into a reality out of my control I’ve got tubes jammed in my veins sensors covering my chest and a cold silver bedpan waiting patiently beside me I also get to wear this unflattering hospital gown while they administer every possible test they can charge my insurance company for on the third day of this drama my doctor walks in and announces well good news Jim you’re healthy as a horse no heart attack just some really bad anxiety and then he asked me now what’s a healthy man like you having so much anxiety for what’s your life like well then I got to confess about the morning routine I’ve developed being a drummer in a band on the road when I wake up in the Morgan morning I crack open a can of redbull so that I can wake up enough to drink a pot of coffee then I drink several more cans through the day I also fess up about eating too much sugar like four bowls of Lucky Charms before bed too much and that for some reason I have trouble sleeping even though I am chronically exhausted I usually get about four hours of sleep per night the doctors face turned somber he looks at me and he says Jim this is a get-out-of-jail-free card I want you to know there was a man who came in the day before you a year than you with a similar condition and who died this morning today you have a chance to make changes that will let you see your kids grow up four hours of sleep per night is sleep deprivation and there is no quicker way to die early than to skimp on sleep especially with all the crap you’re consuming you need at least seven hours to stay healthy seven hours I haven’t gotten not much rest in a long time and now my body is breaking down I know I’ve got to do something or my next trip here might not end well soon I would discover something that changed my life from that moment on the key to falling asleep is rhythm this discovery came from my need to solve a lifelong problem ever since I was a kid at that time I can never get my mind to stop thinking sometimes it will be a worry other times a song will get stuck in my head and just loop around and around when I got home from the hospital I decided to do some research and so I researched sleep and the effects of sleep deprivation which I learned include heart attack stroke weight gain and just as my doctor had told me premature death I also read a Harvard Business study that shows the impairment that happens at four hours of sleep per night is similar to the impairment that happens when a guy my size drinks five regular beers then I came across some startling statistics in the US alone 35% of adults that’s 86 million of us are sleep deprived what’s worse 87 percent of teenagers that’s 36 million kids whose brains are still developing are chronically sleep-deprived worldwide scientists are calling sleep deprivation an emerging global epidemic with low-income people and women being affected the most I know I’ve got to do something and so I let go of the energy drinks I cut way back on coffee and I even get give up my nightly lucky charm feast and it helps a little bit but at bedtime I still cannot get my mind to stop thinking on my way home from work that week an idea hit me I don’t know why I hadn’t thought of it before since 1999 I’ve been leading drumming workshops at the beginning of these programs I leave the UH nexor sighs where the group and I had drum together a steady unison pattern like this boom boom boom boom we do this for a few minutes at the end without fail people tell me that the exercise helps them to feel more relaxed it had never occurred to me that I could do the exercise without my drum and so that night I did an experiment at bedtime I sat at the edge of my bed and I brought my hands to my lap and I began doing my drumming exercise on my legs very lightly upon seeing my strange behavior my wife Tracey looked over at me rolled her eyes and just turned out the lights but I kept at it I wanted to find out if I could get the exercise to work and at first nothing happened but then after about four minutes of persistence I noticed my eyelids starting to get heavy I was yawning and I decided just to lay down and shut my eyes for a minute when I open them again it was morning I slept a solid seven and a half hours with no struggle falling asleep and most nights since 2010 I’ve been getting the best sleep of my life and I do it using an exercise I’m to show you today that I call brain tapping now this exercise uses a phenomenon that happens in the brain it’s called the frequency following response this is a very fancy way of saying that your brain loves to follow repeating rhythmic patterns essentially your brain first notices that there is a pattern it connects with it and it begins to follow it whenever you listen to your favorite music and do this that’s the frequency following a response happening what we’re going to do is we’re going to help that frequency following response to occur we’re gonna activate it and then we’re gonna help to slow the speed of your brain activity down by slowing down the rhythm now there might be a few of you out there right now that are thinking to yourself does this hippie really want me to believe that I can use rhythm to help me fall asleep really and what I would say back to you is what if I could what if I could show you how to fall asleep tonight in less time than it takes you to eat a bowl of cereal would you try it now here’s the great news you do not need to be good at rhythm for this to work only willing to try here’s what happens the exercise it’s 30 seconds what we’re going to do is bring our hands to our lap like this we’re gonna be tapping at the speed of a ticking stopwatch so right left right left right left very lightly as we do this we’re going to breathe slowly at the end we’re gonna slow the rhythm down so if you’re willing I’m gonna invite you just to settle in take a big breath in begin very lightly tapping on your legs at the speed of a ticking stopwatch right left right left right if you’re comfortable I want to invite you just to close your eyes so you can get the full experience next we’re gonna do a very slow breathing technique your job is just to do your best and take breaks if you need them so eyes are closed we’re tapping lightly and let’s start the breathing breathing in slowly two three it’s very slow for and slowly out two three four breathing in doing great two three four and slowly out two three four breathing in almost there two three four and slowly out two very good three four and now slow the tap in down and slow it down again four three two one and relax take a moment to notice how your mind feels let’s take a big breath in and let it go you can open your eyes and I saw a couple of you yawning if I take that as a compliment so thank you if you got the exercise to work the first time congratulations you’ve got a new friend you can call on tonight to help you get to sleep if the exercise didn’t work as you hoped it would don’t worry you’re not broken sometimes it takes a few tries to get used to the exercise please don’t give up now imagine getting great sleep from now on imagine how much better you’ll feel and then imagine people all over the world doing this exercise and getting better quality sleep imagine how that might affect peacefulness everywhere I’ve got a challenge for you for the next five nights I want to invite you just to run the exercise for at least three minutes remember tap like a ticket tipping ticking stopwatch breathe slowly and at the end slow the rhythm down once you’re comfortable with it I want you to feel free to teach it to anyone who needs it especially kids good luck and sweet dreams thank you you
Source : Youtube

SOURCE: click to continue reading How To Trick Your Brain Into Falling Asleep | Jim Donovan | TEDxYoungstown

What causes insomnia? – Dan Kwartler

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5Sl8LyI7k800:00:00المترجم: Kowthar Alasady المدقّق: Hussain Laghabi ما الذي يمنعك من النوم ليلاً؟ أهو التأمل في المسائل العميقة؟ أم الحماس حيال رحلة كبيرة؟ أم التوتر حيال عمل لم تنجزه، أم اختبار على الأبواب، أم لقاء عائلي لعين؟ بالنسبة للكثيرين، هذا التوتر مؤقت لأن سببه يُحَل بسرعة.00:00:23 لكن ماذا لو كان الشيء الذي يؤرقك هو توتر حول الأرق؟ هذه المشكلة المعقدة ظاهرياً هي المسبب الرئيسي للأرق، اضطراب النوم الأكثر شيوعاً في العالم.00:00:36 تقريباً أي شيء قد يسبب الأرق بين الحين والآخر شريك يشخر، ألم جسدي، أو اضطراب عاطفي.00:00:44 والحرمان الشديد من النوم مثل تعب ما بعد السفر والذي قد يعطل ساعتك البيولوجية، ويبطش بنظام نومك بطشًا.00:00:52 لكن في معظم الحالات يكون الحرمان من النوم قصير الأجل.00:00:56 في النهاية، يدركنا الإرهاق جميعا.00:00:59 مع ذلك، بعض الحالات طويلة الأجل مثل اضطراب التنفس ومشاكل المعدة والأمعاء والعديد من الحالات الأخرى التي بإمكانها التغلب على التعب. ومع تزايد الليالي المؤرقة، يبدأ السرير بالتعود على هذه الليالي التي يعصف بها القلق. يأتي وقت النوم، ويشعر المصابون بالأرق بالتوتر.00:01:19 توتر شديد بحيث تستحوذ أدمغتهم على نظام الاستجابة للتوتر، مشبعاً الجسم بالمواد الكيميائية الخاصة باستجابة القتال أو الهروب أو التجمد.00:01:27 يسري كورتيزول والهرمونات الموجهة لقشر الكظر عبر مجرى الدم، مما يزيد معدل نبض القلب وضغط الدم.00:01:35 ويجعل الجسم يتحرك فجأة بسبب فرط التيقظ.00:01:38 في هذه الحالة، يبحث الدماغ عن تهديدات محتملة.00:01:41 جاعلاً من الممكن تجاهل أي قلق بسيط أو إزعاج ليلي. وعندما ينام المصاب بالأرق أخيراً، فإن جودة راحته تنخفض.00:01:52 مصدر الطاقة الرئيسي للدماغ هو الجلوكوز، وعند النوم تتباطأ عملية الأيض الغذائي لدينا للاحتفاظ بالجلوكوز لساعات الاستيقاظ.00:02:02 وتظهر دراسات PET أن الأدرنالين الذي يمنع النوم عن المصابين بالأرق يسرع أيضاً عملية الأيض الغذائي لديهم.00:02:09 عندما ينام المصابون بالأرق، فإن أجسامهم تظل تعمل ساعات إضافية.00:02:12 مستهلكة الطاقة التي يستمدها الدماغ من الجلوكوز.00:02:16 عارض قلة نوم هذا يجعل المصاب بالأرق يستيقظ في حالة تعب وإرباك وتوتر، والذي يجعل العملية تبدأ من جديد.00:02:27 عندما تستمر نوبات القلق والتوتر لأكثر من الشهر، فإنه يتم تشخيصها على أنها أرق مزمن. ورغم أن الأرق قلما يؤدي إلى موت، إلا إن آليات علاجه الكيميائي شبيهة بنوبات القلق الموجودة لدي أولئك الذين يعانون من القلق والاكتئاب. لذا فالإصابة بأحد هذه الأعراض تزيد خطر تعرضك للأخرتين.00:02:50 لحسن الحظ، هناك طرق للتخلص من حالة الأرق. السيطرة على التوتر الذي يقود إلى فرط التقيظ هي أفضل الطرق المعروفة لدينا لعلاج الأرق، وممارسات النوم الجيدة يمكن أن تساعد في إعادة بناء علاقتك مع وقت نوم.00:03:04 احرص على أن يكون سريرك مظلم ومريح وجيد لتقليل المخاطر إلى أدنى حد خلال فرط التيقظ. لا تستخدم سريرك إلا عند النوم، وإذا كنت تشعر بالقلق، اترك الغرفة وأشغل نفسك في ممارسة الانشطة التي تبعث على الاسترخاء كالقراءة والتأمل وتصفح المجلات.00:03:21 نظم أيضك بواسطة تحديد أوقات للراحة والاستيقاظ للمساعدة في توجيه ساعة جسمك البيولوجية. هذه الساعة، أو التواتر اليومي، أيضاً تكون حساسة من الضوء. لذا ابتعد عن الأضواء الساطعة في الليل لتخبر جسمك أنه حان الوقت النوم. فضلاً عن هذه الممارسات، يقوم بعض الأطباء بوصف أدوية

SOURCE: click to continue reading What causes insomnia? – Dan Kwartler

Sleep Hygiene – How to Sleep Better!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQ8uc85cEu400:00:00we explain how you can get a better night's sleep again this is Simon Simon has trouble sleeping at night he can't get any shut-eye so in the daytime he can hardly focus and is constantly tired which puts him in a lousy mood he wonders how he can get rid of his problem what controls sleep anyway it's not just based on outside factors like lighten darkness if it were we wouldn't have jetlag in fact it's mainly controlled by our internal biological clock the body's rhythm which governs sleep as well as the activities of our organs the brain coordinates this by sending various signaling molecules or hormones including the body's built-in sleeping pill melatonin when the body has gotten used to a rhythm the release of the hormone is well adapted and sleep is under control when this rhythm is disrupted that can cause a sleep disorder then the body needs clear signals in order to re-enter a regular sleep-wake rhythm so Simon doesn't just doze off at night on the couch anymore when it's time to sleep he goes straight to bed now he can watch his favorite TV show again without getting tired because his body knows it's only time for melatonin when Simon is in bed following a bedtime ritual helps his body prepare for sleep however Simon doesn't watch TV in his bedroom anymore and from now on always eats breakfast in the kitchen working or doing other things in bed is off-limits only when his girlfriend Simone visits and he make an exception now Simon refrains from consuming alcohol caffeine and heavy meals because they worsen the quality of sleep instead he makes sure to exercise that way Simon is tired by nighttime now that Simon always wakes up at the same time each morning he also gets sleepy at the same time every evening since he knows that he shouldn't throw off the melatonin Simon goes to sleep as soon as he's tired if Simon wakes up at night he doesn't watch the clock but just lies there relaxed after all the sleep cycle also includes built-in phases of wakefulness one sleep phase lasts one and a half hours so it's recommended to sleep six seven and a half or nine hours that's why Simon gets up as soon as the alarm goes off no pressing that snooze button now Simon knows everything he needs to for his internal clock to tick perfectly he starts the day in a good mood goes to work focused and has his sleep under control Wir erklären, wie Sie wieder besser schlafen können.00:00:04 Das ist Simon. Simon hat Schlafprobleme: Nachts kriegt er kein Auge zu, tagsüber kann er sich dafür gar nicht konzentrieren und ist andauernd müde. Und deshalb mies gelaunt.00:00:16 Er fragt sich, wie er sein Problem loswird. Was regelt eigentlich den Schlaf? Dafür sorgen nicht nur äußere Bedingungen wie Licht und Dunkel – sonst hätten wir keinen Jetlag – sondern vor allem die innere menschliche Uhr: Der körpereigene Rhythmus, der nicht nur den Schlaf, sondern au

SOURCE: click to continue reading Sleep Hygiene – How to Sleep Better!

What would happen if you didn’t sleep? – Claudia Aguirre

In 1965, 17-year-old high school student, Randy Gardner stayed awake for 264 hours. That’s 11 days to see how he’d cope without sleep. On the second day, his eyes stopped focusing. Next, he lost the ability to identify objects by touch.

By day three, Gardner was moody and uncoordinated. At the end of the experiment, he was struggling to concentrate, had trouble with short-term memory, became paranoid, and started hallucinating. Although Gardner recovered without long-term psychological or physical damage, for others, losing shuteye can result in hormonal imbalance, illness, and, in extreme cases, death.

SOURCE: click to continue reading What would happen if you didn’t sleep? – Claudia Aguirre

6 tips for better sleep | Sleeping with Science, a TED series

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0kACis_dJE00:00:00Transcriber: TED Translators admin Reviewer: Ivana Korom We can all have a bad night of sleep and that's perfectly normal, but how could we try to improve both the quantity and the quality of our sleep? [Sleeping with Science] (Music) Here are six scientifically grounded tips for better sleep. The first tip is regularity.00:00:23 Go to bed at the same time and wake up at the same time. Regularity is king, and it will actually anchor your sleep and improve both the quantity and the quality, no matter whether it's the weekday or the weekend or even if you've had a bad night of sleep.00:00:40 And the reason is because deep within your brain, you actually have a master 24-hour clock. It expects regularity and works best under conditions of regularity, including the control of your sleep-wake schedule. Many of us use an alarm to wake up but very few of us use a to-bed alarm, and that's something that can be helpful. The next tip is temperature. Keep it cool. It turns out that your brain and your body need to drop their core temperature by about one degree Celsius or around two to three degrees Fahrenheit in order to initiate sleep and then to stay asleep.00:01:22 And this is the reason that you will always find it easier to fall asleep in a room that's too cold than too hot. So, the current recommendation is to aim for a bedroom temperature of around about 65 degrees Fahrenheit, or a little over 18 degrees Celsius.00:01:40 It sounds cold but cold it must be. The next tip is darkness.00:01:46 We are a dark-deprived society and, in fact, we need darkness specifically in the evening to trigger the release of a hormone called melatonin.00:01:57 And melatonin helps regulate the healthy timing of our sleep. In the last hour before bed, try to stay away from all of those computer screens and tablets and phones.00:02:10 Dim down half the lights in your house. You'd actually be quite surprised at how sleepy that can make you feel. If you'd like, you can wear an eye mask or you can have blackout shades and that will help best regulate that critical sleep hormone of melatonin. The next tip is walk it out.00:02:31 Don't stay in bed awake for long periods of time. And the general rule of thumb is if you've been trying to fall asleep and it's been 25 minutes or so, or you've woken up and you can't get back to sleep after 25 minutes, the recommendation is to get out of bed and go and do something different. And the reason is because your brain is an incredibly associative device. The brain has learned the association that the bed is this trigger of wakefulness, and we need to break that association.00:03:05 And by getting out of bed, you can go and do something else.00:03:08 Only return to bed when you're sleepy. And in that way, gradually, your brain will relearn the association that your bed is this place of sound and consistent sleep. The fifth tip is

SOURCE: click to continue reading 6 tips for better sleep | Sleeping with Science, a TED series

Sleep deprivation and memory problems | Robbert Havekes | TEDxDenHelder

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F39IBJZlsek
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SOURCE: click to continue reading Sleep deprivation and memory problems | Robbert Havekes | TEDxDenHelder